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An interactive chart of the lending pipeline for the World Bank in response to COVID-19

Tracking the World Bank’s Response to COVID-19

In recent years, many commentators have asked if the World Bank is still relevant. We’re about to find out. To track the World Bank’s response to COVID-19, we’ve built a small interactive tool to display how much each country has received to date, and what’s currently in the pipeline for approval.

Stock photo of a pile of money getting larger. Adobe Stock

Mobilizing $400 Billion: Using the Visible Hand of Development Banks

Is the crisis a signal on how devastating the great problems confronting our future could be in a world that is not prepared for them, in particular to face challenges such as major inequalities, the climate emergency, and the loss of nature. The way in which our world produces and consumes, calls for a recovery that would also imply a structural transformation towards a more inclusive and sustainable economic model. DBs could be a great contributor to such a transformation.

A stock photo of a see-through piggy bank. Adobe Stock.

A Reckoning for China’s Opaque Overseas Lending

We are so accustomed to the Chinese government’s lack of transparency that the opaqueness of China’s overseas loans seems unremarkable at this point. But as we face what inevitably looks like a global debt crisis, one that is likely to hit low-income countries particularly hard, a clear accounting of the scale of the problem is critical. 

Disinfection and decontamination on a marketplace “Krasno selo” as a prevention against Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

The CARES Act: A Down Payment on Global COVID-19 Response Efforts?

While the vast majority of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) signed into law late last week is devoted to domestic response and relief, the measure does include modest supplemental foreign aid funding and pending authorizations for international financial institutions to support the international response. These provisions, combined with the foreign aid funding provided as part of the initial supplemental legislation, are important.

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