Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

Meet the Global Health Family: A Cheat Sheet

This is a joint post with Rachel Silverman.

Through our Value for Money working group, we’ve spent much of the past year immersed in the world of global health funding agencies. With so many new agencies, particularly in the last quarter century (Figure 1), understanding the intricacies of the global health family can be daunting, even for the most devoted observers.

Global Health Loves N-Grams Too!

Continuing the N-gram craze (see Charles Kenny’s post here), I’ve compared the Google Books presence of the World Bank to the World Health Organization. The good news: WHO’s star is on the rise!

How Plausible Are the Predictions of AIDS Models?

UNAIDS, WHO, PEPFAR and the Global Fund for AIDS TB and Malaria (GFATM) all depend on long-run projections in order to make the case for increased attention and financing for AIDS.  This dependency is a response to the reality that HIV is a slow epidemic with extraordinary “momentum”.  Even small changes in the course of new infections require years to implement and have health and fiscal consequences for decades thereafter.  According to the UNAIDS web site, “[s]ince 2001, the UNAIDS Secretariat have le

Lighting Up the IP Debate

Victoria Hale, head of OneWorld Health, an innovative non-profit pharmaceutical firm, reckons that compulsory licensing could prove "the last blow" that pushes the drug industry away from looking for cures for diseases of the poor world, which are already woefully neglected...

Bruce Lehman, a lawyer who worked on the TRIPS [sic] accord in the Clinton administration, thinks it is cynical for middle-income countries "to avoid paying their fair share of drug-discovery costs."

Flu Vaccine Woes

Once again, volatile demand for flu vaccine is giving everyone a headache. A mere two years ago supply fell badly short of demand, turning US seniors into "immunization tourists" to Canada, and putting President Bush on the defensive during the 2004 campaign. This year, demand is way off, and suppliers can barely give the vaccine away; they face the prospect of wasting valuable doses because the vaccine is developed specifically for this year's strain.

Beating Drug Resistance: Chloroquine Proven to Have Regained Effectiveness Against Malaria

In the midst of all the recent political developments in global health, there's an exciting surprise on the scientific front: a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that chloroquine cured 99% of malaria cases in a study of 105 children in Malawi, over 12 years after it was withdrawn due to treatment failure rates of over 50% (as reported in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and elsewhere).

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