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How NATO Contributors are Resettling their Afghan Allies

Customary international humanitarian law includes a responsibility to protect journalists and aid workers from harm, but it does not cover interpreters and others working for allied members. As a result, it’s down to each individual country to determine how they feel they should respond. Here we outline the responses of six of the top ten contributors to the NATO-led forces: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

Map of countries showing how many Venezuelan migrants are in each.

Beneficial Policies Towards the Venezuela Crisis Depend on Development Finance

The political and economic crisis in Venezuela has caused the biggest population movement in recent Latin American history. Support from the international community has predominantly focused on short-term humanitarian assistance, which will remain important for the most vulnerable Venezuelans. However, in what has become a protracted displacement crisis, it is also essential to shift to a longer-term vision and approach underpinned by development finance.

A building in a refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

Two Years On, and No End in Sight: How Should We Respond to the Rohingya Crisis in the Medium-Term?

This Sunday marks two years since Myanmar’s military dramatically escalated its systematic campaign of violence against the Rohingya, causing over 700,000 of the long-persecuted and stateless population to flee to Bangladesh. Even if repatriation began tomorrow, estimates suggest a significant number of refugees would remain in Bangladesh over ten years from now. The international community and Bangladesh can’t afford to just plan for the short term.

A Syrian woman at a sewing machine

IDA Funding for Refugees and Hosts: 5 Ways to Improve and Why We Need More

On average, a refugee is displaced for 10 years, and after being displaced for five years, the average jumps to more than 20 years. The world could no longer ignore this reality in 2015, when more than one million asylum seekers and migrants arrived to Europe seeking refuge and opportunity. The phenomenon, however, was nothing new for the numerous refugee-hosting countries around the world. These countries, many of which are in the developing world, are all too familiar with the limits of traditional humanitarian approaches—short-term, siloed, and focused on life-saving needs.

Refugees at the Kutupalong refugee camp near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo by Russell Watkin, DFID.

Close to Home: The Role of Regional Partners in Advancing Medium-Term Solutions for Rohingya Refugees and Hosts in Bangladesh

The Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh continues to grip the region and—particularly with heightened risks during monsoon season—international headlines. There have been important steps toward a comprehensive solution that recognizes the reality of protracted displacement—but additional commitments and coordinated policy dialogue are needed. And regional partners will be key to the ultimate success of these efforts.

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