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Vaccines for Gavi

Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance: Doubling Down on Coverage, Partnerships, and Transition Incentives for the Next Phase

With the Global Fund and Global Polio Eradication Initiative replenishments successfully concluded, donors are turning their attention to the Gavi Alliance whose third replenishment process is scheduled to culminate in summer 2020. As the final Gavi Board meeting of 2019 kicks off next week, it’s time to sharpen goals and double down on strategies to enhance the partnership’s public health impact.

A child receives the oral Polio vaccine at a clinic in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Photo by Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Gavi@20: What’s Next for Global Immunization Efforts

The Board of Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, will retreat next week to discuss a new strategy and replenishment. My colleagues and I have put together a preliminary set of six short notes that examine different dimensions of Gavi’s work and make recommendations for ways to address identified issues.

Child receives immunization in Uttar Pradesh

Gavi Going Forward: Immunization for Every Child Everywhere?

In December 2018, the Gavi Alliance hosted a mid-term review to assess progress towards its core purpose: “reach every child everywhere with vaccines against preventable diseases.” The good news is that there’s been advances on new vaccine introductions, and an estimated 65 million children were immunized with Gavi-supported new and underutilized vaccines in 2017. The bad news? There is still huge variability on the measure that counts most for building herd immunity and reducing vaccine-preventable disease: full vaccination for age among children under 2 years old.

New Data, Same Story: Disease Still Concentrated in Middle-Income Countries

This is a joint post with Yuna Sakuma.

The majority of the world’s sick live in middle-income countries (MIC) – mainly Pakistan, India, Nigeria, China and Indonesia (or PINCI), according to new data from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.  Sound familiar? Andy Sumner, Denizhan Duran, and I came to the same conclusion in a 2011 paper, but we used 2004 disease burden data, which didn’t provide an up-to-date view of reality.  So I was pleased to see that our findings still hold based on IHME’s 2010 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) estimates.  

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