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CGD Policy Blogs

 

An image of a wind farm

COP26 and Beyond: CGD’s Work on Coherence and Effectiveness in Climate Finance and Policy

With COP26 about to get underway, many of the opportunities and tensions inherent in the international community’s approach to supporting climate change transformation are rising to the surface. Within the rich body of work which is ongoing within this area, CGD’s focus is on shaping and improving climate and finance policy to ensure it does the most for the development, and the planet. We hope that national leaders will use this moment to make credible, ambitious emissions-reduction plans for the future, and commit to better quality of climate finance to address challenges in the most vulnerable countries. As finance is shifted towards climate challenges, if providers do not focus on the effectiveness of that investment as part of a coherent system of policies then neither climate nor development goals will be achieved.

An image of carbon dioxide smokestacks.

Is $100 Billion a Year Enough to Cover the Cost of Climate Damage?

A central commitment of action on climate is the promise of “developed countries” to jointly mobilize $100 billion of climate finance per year by 2020 (and through to 2025). How does this promise—which developed countries have so far failed to reach—compare to the actual cost of the damage caused by their emissions? Today we publish a paper that answers that question by estimating the liability each country bears for the costs of damage caused by carbon emissions to date. We limit this liability with two assumptions. First, we only count damage from when international awareness of climate issues grew. Second, we reduce the cost applied to older emissions. These limitations are arguably conservative—and we consider other scenarios in the paper.

An image of land impacted by a drought due to climate change.

A Hot Topic: The Role of US Development Assistance in Addressing the Climate Crisis

With COP26 only weeks away, policymakers around the world are focusing renewed attention on the climate crisis—and the US Congress is no exception. An upcoming House Foreign Affairs hearing, convened jointly by the Subcommittee on International Development, International Organizations, and Global Corporate Social Impact and the Subcommittee on Europe, Energy, the Environment and Cyber, will profile US plans to combat climate change through development assistance.