Ideas to Action:

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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Equatorial Guinea's Corruption Scandal: African Poverty, Mansions, and the California Sun?

What kind of home can you get as an African agriculture minister with a 60k salary? If you're the son of an African leader running an oil-rich country, apparently you can afford a Malibu mansion. The UK-based anti-graft watchdog, Global Witness, recently outed the son of President Obiang of Equitorial Guinea, who purchased a $35 million California home this spring, complete with 16 acres, a golf course, tennis court and a swimming pool.

2006 Commitment to Development Index Launches

I am pleased to announce the release of the 2006 edition of the Commitment to Development Index. Each year the CDI rates and ranks 21 rich countries on how much their policies help or hurt poorer nations. The CDI assigns scores in seven policy areas (foreign aid, trade, investment, migration, environment, security, and technology), with the average being the overall score.

Transparency: A Clear Need in Global Health

The Economist is spot-on in identifying transparency in reporting of infectious diseases as a powerful weapon in the global health fight. While Indonesia's government seems to be making moves in the right direction by providing official access to data on avian influenza, the magazine reports, insurgent efforts at transparency are in development, with the Google Foundation head taking charge:

CGD Workshop Explores Economic Performance of the World's Youngest Democracies

Twenty experts in development from the academic and policy communities gathered at CGD on Monday 12 June to assess the economic performance of the world’s youngest or “third wave” democracies. The purpose of the discussion was to consider under which economic conditions these democracies are most likely to consolidate--or to backslide and even reverse--and to discuss what the international community can do to support these new democracies.

More bad news for oil transparency in Congo-Brazzaville

According to Reuters, two anti-corruption campaigners have been arrested in Congo-Brazzaville, allegedly for embezzling funds. If true, it is disturbing that people tasked with overseeing fiscal transparency are themselves involved in fraud, and bodes poorly for Congo’s chances of breaking its cycle of wasting public money.

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