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CGD Policy Blogs

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An overhead show of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Bangladesh: Growth Miracle or Mirage?

Among South Asian economies, Bangladesh is touted as a rising star.  But is the praise entirely justified? Can Bangladesh now serve as a model for other countries, perhaps offering an alternative to the longstanding East Asian export-led growth paradigm? The jury is still out however, and the evidence raises doubt that the East Asian icons face serious competition from Bangladesh—at least not yet.

Shipping containers stacked at a por

Multilateral Trade Agreements Should Constitute the Cornerstone of Biden’s US-Africa Policy

The ongoing negotiations over a US-Kenya trade agreement embody the contradictions and likely pitfalls in the Biden Administration's Africa policy. Despite assurances from its promoters, the potential agreement remains unpopular in African states. Many observers view such a deal as potentially undermining the AfCFTA and African economic unity. As the region’s population and economies continue to expand, African multilateralism is most likely going to get stronger over time. Therefore, for any trade deal to work in strengthening US-Africa ties in the long run, it must be seen by citizens in various African states to be mutually beneficial and consistent with African multilateral initiatives like the AfCFTA.

Chart showing that Third Space Learning, which uses Sri Lankan tutors, is significantly cheaper than all other providers, which use UK-based tutors

Offshoring Education is Good for the Poor

Two positive development stories emerged from the UK education sector last week: A new tutoring scheme is hiring Sri Lankan tutors for British children. And the UK Department for Education is proposing a new international teaching qualification, which could make international recruitment easier.

Multicolored shipping containers at a port

US Trade Policy Shouldn’t Pit Developing Countries Against Each Other

The global economy is gradually healing from the economic blows dealt by the coronavirus pandemic, but the recovery remains fragile and halting. Reduced trade is more a symptom than a cause of those trends—and what governments do in terms of additional fiscal stimulus will do far more to determine the shape of the recovery in the United States and other countries. Still, trade policy could be a factor, supporting or undermining the nascent recovery.

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