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How NATO Contributors are Resettling their Afghan Allies

Customary international humanitarian law includes a responsibility to protect journalists and aid workers from harm, but it does not cover interpreters and others working for allied members. As a result, it’s down to each individual country to determine how they feel they should respond. Here we outline the responses of six of the top ten contributors to the NATO-led forces: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

An image of a person giving another person a bowl of food.

Who Represents Whom? A Conversation on Decolonizing Humanitarian Governance

The Black Lives Matter movement, #AidToo, and the failure to support locally-led responses during COVID-19 have spotlighted power imbalances in the humanitarian sector. Whether between large NGOs and local organizations, or crisis-affected populations, there are limited ways for people to participate in decisions that affect them, particularly those on the frontline.

Work Visas to the US: How Do We Make Sure Women from the Northern Triangle Don’t Get Left Behind?

Gender equality has been touted as a political priority by the Biden administration, as demonstrated through the establishment of the White House Gender Policy Council, as well as its commitment to unveiling a whole-of-government strategy to advance gender equity and equality later this year. Here we make the case for why US immigration policy needs a gender-intentional approach, and how the administration should apply this approach towards policy in Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras.

A humanitarian worker distributes aid.

Beyond the Grand Bargain: The Humanitarian Financing Model Needs More Radical Change

The global scale of the pandemic has not only placed new constraints on the current humanitarian financing model. It has also revealed, once more, chronic difficulties to pre-arrange resources in the face of predictable needs and to channel resources efficiently to the frontlines. As the system faces this and other threats—climate change and an increase in conflict—financial resources are outpaced by the growth in needs. Now is the time to collectively agree more ambitious changes

A man named Rubiel Rios Andrade dries cacao on his farm in township of La Paz, Colombia

There's No Such Thing as a “Low”-Skill Worker

High-income countries depend on immigration to help foster strong societies and economies. Yet when deciding who is allowed to enter, most use a simple dichotomy based on educational attainment: “high” and “low” skilled. In this blog, based on a new policy brief by Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP) and discussions at a recent LaMP-CGD co-hosted event, we outline why this dichotomy is wrong, and how high-income countries can build mutually beneficial migration pathways at all skill levels.

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