Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

The Premier Research Conference on the Economics of Migration and Development: A Call for Papers

International labor mobility holds some of the biggest opportunities to extend economic opportunity to more people. A small group of economists and other social scientists is working to understand those opportunities better. They have coalesced around an annual but still-young research conference, the Migration and Development Conference—and I’m delighted to say that CGD is involved.

Two Guest Worker Programs that Are Working

With funding for the federal government restored and the debt ceiling crisis averted (for now), President Obama has called on Congress to address three policy priorities in what remains of 2013. I'm thrilled to learn that immigration reform made the cut. I'm particularly interested in the Senate-passed proposal for temporary low-skill employment permits, the W-visa.

Migration and the Trillion Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk: Michael Clemens

In this Wonkcast, originally posted on September 7, 2011, Michael Clemens explains why one of the biggest growth opportunities in the world economy lies not in the mobility of goods or capital, but in the mobility of labor. His message remains relevant as International Migrants Day approaches on December 18th. In his recent blog, Clemens argues we have plenty of reason to celebrate the movement of people – and backs it up with economic evidence and history.

Do Immigrants Fill Public Coffers, or Drain Them? We Finally Have an Authoritative Estimate

People who move from poor countries to rich countries add colossal value to the world economy. They can do this, my research has shown, because their labor is often several times more valuable in the countries they move to. Workers who move, even in modest numbers, can create economic gains in the trillions of dollars, and most of that value accrues to the destination country.

The Magically Vanishing Slice of Pie: Shockingly Bad Methods behind the Heritage Foundation’s Estimates of the Fiscal Costs of Unauthorized Immigration

Robert Rector and Jason Richwine of the Heritage Foundation have written a report claiming that regularizing unauthorized immigrants in the United States will cost American taxpayers trillions of dollars. Neither Rector nor Richwine are trained economists and the methods that they use to arrive at this number are not economic analysis.

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