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CGD Policy Blogs

 

A container with vaccine bottles lined up next to each other

Monday Morning Vaccine Breakthrough: Terrific News for the West, but in LMICs Terms and Conditions Apply

This morning, America (and much of the world) woke up to a snippet of terrific news: Pfizer and BioNTech announced their SARS-CoV2 vaccine candidate showed 90 percent efficacy. But for policymakers in low- and middle-income countries, today’s news offers limited cause for celebration—and the Pfizer/BioNTech results may even lengthen the timeline for eventual LMIC access.

The Race for a COVID-19 Vaccine: An Overview of Current Proposals and Our Contribution in Bringing in the Missing Middle

Much rests with the successful development and introduction of an effective COVID-19 vaccine. It may be our only path towards fully reopening our economies without fear of future outbreaks and associated health and economic impacts. See here for an overview of recent vaccine initiatives. 

Graphic explaining MVAC process

A Final MVAC Blueprint—and the Start of an R&D Revolution?

Despite decades of investment, TB remains a global crisis. Each year, TB kills 1.6 million people—making it the world’s deadliest infectious diseases. We have set out to develop a solution: what we ultimately called the Market-Driven, Value-Based Advance Commitment (MVAC), a mechanism to create and guarantee a market for better TB treatment, if and when such a treatment becomes available.

A nurse at Merawi health centre in northern Ethiopia prepares a measles vaccine for delivery.

We Asked, You Answered: Reflections on the First Round of MVAC Feedback

In March, our team at the Center for Global Development and Office of Health Economics posted a consultation draft of a policy proposal for a Market-Driven, Value-Based Advanced Commitment (MVAC). The MVAC is a new mechanism that puts middle-income country governments in the driver’s seat to accelerate R&D for diseases that affect the world’s poor—specifically, the 10 million men, women, and children who develop tuberculosis (TB) disease each year and desperately need better therapies. 

Nice Job on Polio, but Don’t Forget the Other Diseases

Yesterday the global health community celebrated a much anticipated anniversary: one year has passed since India’s last reported case of polio. While still tenuous, this achievement is an important milestone for the international effort to attain polio eradication. If India can maintain this progress, then only three countries – Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan – will remain polio-endemic, down from 125+ countries worldwide in 1988. (As an aside, the WHO describes India as “one of the largest donors to polio eradication being largely self financed.” Are donations to oneself – or “unilateral” donors, if you will – the way of the future?)