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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Young women work at a pharmaceutical company in Afghanistan

COVID-19 Surfaces New Directions for Old Challenges: Three Lasting Ways to Improve Global Health Procurement

Effective and efficient procurement of health products—medicines, diagnostics, and devices—is a critical function of all strong health systems. The pandemic has exacerbated long-standing challenges—as highlighted by a recent CGD Working Group—in the purchasing of both COVID-related emergency supplies and other essential health products.

The State of Global Health Commodity Procurement: Moving from Data Points to the Bigger Picture

“Better data drive better decisions” is a truism that researchers everywhere are all too familiar with. Increasing the availability, usability, and relevance of data is key to tracking performance and informing smarter, more efficient policies—but too often the data we need simply aren’t available, at least not in a useful format. Recently, we’ve been exploring the availability of data (or lack thereof) related to global health commodity markets in the context of CGD’s working group on the Future of Global Health Procurement. To ground the working group’s recommendations, we’re trying to understand the current state of health commodity procurement in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs)—specifically which commodities are procured, by whom, how, and at what price.

Sizing Up Health Commodity Markets in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Take One

What can we say about the relative size and composition of health commodity markets across different countries? We took a stab at piecing together publicly available data sources to find an initial answer for low- and middle-income countries as part of the background work to inform the CGD Working Group on the Future of Global Health Procurement.

The Changing Landscape of Global Health Procurement: Acting Now to Prepare for the Future

Health products—including drugs, devices, diagnostics, and vector control tools—are essential for meeting the healthcare needs of any population. Right now, many low- and lower-middle-income countries rely on donor-managed mechanisms to procure a large share of these health commodities. But this status quo won’t stay static for long, and the global health community must prepare for sweeping changes in global health and procurement over the next 10–20 years. Here’s some of what we see happening now and on the immediate horizon.