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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Lagos to Mombasa

Lagos to Mombasa: Can Agriculture Drive Economic Growth in Africa?

This episode of Lagos to Mombasa asks: could ag policy be a means to post-COVID-19 recovery in Africa? Linda Manda of Standard Bank Group and Gillian Pais of McKinsey & Company join Gyude to discuss the true potential of the agriculture sector, not just in addressing Africa’s own food security needs but also in its global contributions.

El Niño vs El Tío: What’s Causing Food Insecurity in Southern Africa?

The UN’s World Food Program now estimates that some three million Zimbabweans, or roughly one-quarter of the population, may require food aid this year. Zimbabwe is suffering from erratic rainfall this year, blamed in large part on the El Niño weather phenomena. An estimated 70% of Zimbabweans rely on agriculture, so the impact on poverty and human welfare will no doubt be severe. But in reading about Zimbabwe’s current predicament, something struck me:  neighboring Zambia seems to have no urgent food aid requirements.

Why Adesina Won the AfDB Presidency and What He Should Do First

The African Development Bank has just elected its new President, Akenwumi Adesina, Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development for Nigeria. My guest this week Bobby Pittman watched the multi-stage election process unfold in Abidjan. Pittman, a former Vice President at the AfDB and, before that a senior adviser to President Bush on Africa, now runs Kupanda Capital, an investment firm focused on Africa. Bobby shares his thoughts on Adesina's winning qualities and what his focus should be for the bank.

Is Agribusiness the Key to Africa’s Growth?

Today, the World Bank launched a new report, "Growing Africa: Unlocking the Potential of Agribusiness." The report argues that agriculture and agribusiness should be at the top of the development and business agenda in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Bank is right to emphasize this issue--of the $25 billion of food that African countries import annually, only $1 billion comes from other African countries. The report offers a clear and well-researched exposition of the state and prospects of African agribusiness. It is broad in scope, encompassing agricultural production and upstream input markets as well as supply chains and agro-processing.