Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

What Works in Malaria Control?

This is the first blog in a series of two. Read the second here. This is a joint post with Miriam Temin. Miriam is coordinating editor for the new edition of Millions Saved.

After a comprehensive literature review, expert consultations, public calls for proposals, and advisory group meetings, we’ve mostly decided on a short list of cases for the new edition of Millions Saved—a book of case studies that document global health successes at scale. Selected interventions range from helmet laws to universal health coverage programs—but one of the most well-known global health efforts of the last decade, malaria control, hasn’t made our list -- at least not yet (for more on what did make the list, check back here in the coming months). 

Wanted: Better HIV Infection Data

UNAIDS recently convened a diverse group of experts to discuss how UNAIDS should go about estimating the post-2015 cost of the HIV/AIDS response.  Participants opinions varied on most topics: whether estimates should assess the cost of treating all HIV infected people as soon as they are infected (the “Universal Test and Treat” option) or that of a less ambitious treatment policy; whether spending on poverty reduction and gender empowerment should be included in the cost estimates and, if so, on how to cost these “critical enablers.” But on one question, there appeared to be virtually unanimous agreement:  donors and countries should increase the frequency, the granularity and the precision of HIV infection surveys.