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Why Adesina Won the AfDB Presidency and What He Should Do First

The African Development Bank has just elected its new President, Akenwumi Adesina, Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development for Nigeria. My guest this week Bobby Pittman watched the multi-stage election process unfold in Abidjan. Pittman, a former Vice President at the AfDB and, before that a senior adviser to President Bush on Africa, now runs Kupanda Capital, an investment firm focused on Africa. Bobby shares his thoughts on Adesina's winning qualities and what his focus should be for the bank.

Hooray for Antibiotic-Free Chickens! But We Can't Stop There

It seems the era of feeding large volumes of antibiotics to chickens to promote growth and prevent disease is on its way out. Tyson Foods announced it will join fellow producers, Perdue and Pilgrim’s Pride, and large buyers, such as McDonald’s, Chick-fil-A, and Chipotle, in sharply reducing use in chickens of antibiotics that are also used in human medicine.

Biofuel Subsidies: Bad Policies, Bad Examples for Development

If you haven’t been following debates on biofuels recently, you’ve been missing a lot of excitement.  Fortunately, a timely new CGD Working Paper by my colleague Kim Elliott provides a primer for how to think about these debates through the lens of development.  The bottom line is that biofuel subsidies in rich countries are bad for development by increasing the costs of food and driving tropical deforestation even while failing to reduce t

Welcome US Action against Drug Resistance, but Livestock Loophole Remains

With the threat of antimicrobial resistance on the rise, we are heartened by President Barack Obama’s recent executive order that outlines a national strategy to combat drug resistance, including creation of an inter-agency task force to implement and monitor the plan.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that up to 2 million Americans suffer from antibiotic-resistant infections each year and that 23,000 of them die.

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