Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

A screenshot of the frontpage of c19economics.org

A Platform to Support the Researchers and Decision-makers Generating and Using Health Economics Research to Tackle COVID-19

Since the beginning of the outbreak, the scientific community has worked around the clock to produce evidence to support decision-makers in all aspects of COVID management. However, health economics research has been largely missing from this growing literature. The C19economics.org platform has been launched to support policymakers (and their advisers) and researchers working on health economics for COVID, with a focus on LMICs.

A close-up of some pills

Healthcare Technologies and COVID-19: Speed is Not Always a Good Thing

With a focus on tests, treatments, and a vaccine, we take a look at the emerging global clinical and economic evidence-base underpinning some of these technologies, the mechanisms (mostly global) for financing these commodities, and, finally, the decision-making processes for selecting technologies. This includes identifying the right subpopulations and negotiating a cost-effective tiered price across countries and regions.

A map showing the stringency of lockdowns in Africa. Image from Our World in Data.

A Tool to Estimate the Net Health Impact of COVID-19 Policies

We have developed a simple tool that enables users to estimate non-COVID-19 health effects for their own context, using their own data or assumptions. In this blog, we explain how the COVID-19 Net Health Impact Calculator works and demonstrate its use by providing some preliminary estimates for the Sahel region. We encourage you to explore the calculator and read more about its use in its user guide.

A figure showing that the patients with the most critical cases are a small percentage but their case takes most of the resources required.

Strengthening the Basics: Approaches to COVID-19 Care in Low-Resource Settings

This blog focuses on hospital treatment for COVID-19 patients in low-resource-settings, considering what we know about the spectrum of COVID-19 illness and what this tells us about where resources might best be focused in low-resource-settings. As elsewhere, decision makers, global and local, must prioritise resourcing and capacity development for the ward-level care and simple oxygen therapy that most hospitalised COVID-19 patients will need—not the high-end clinical care that may well be impossible to scale-up in time in countries with limited resources.