Ideas to Action:

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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Lagos to Mombasa

Lagos to Mombasa: How Does the Pandemic End in Africa?

This first episode of the new Africa-centered podcast series Lagos to Mombasa examines how African governments can shape their responses to the pandemic and prepare for the future. Patrick Tippoo of Biovac and the African Vaccine Manufacturing Initiative and Prashant Yadav from CGD join Gyude Moore to discuss options and opportunities.

summer reading book covers

What We're Reading in Summer 2021

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of vaccines and reopening, it was the age of the Delta variant and closing down again. For many of us, the past year and a half has been stranger than fiction, a whirlwind of emotions and uncertainties. We hope this year's summer reading list provides you with new stories, strategies, and distractions to get you through the next few socially-distanced, masked-up months.

An image of shipping containers.

Shock to the System: Understanding Global Medical Supply, Shortages in COVID-19 Crisis, and How to Prepare for Future Disruptions

Since March of 2020, COVID-19 changed most aspects of life as we knew it, from our personal day-to-day activities to the systems, processes, and structures that keep the global economy interconnected and moving. This included pharmaceutical production and distribution, where anecdotal evidence suggested production problems, export bans, and trade disruption could significantly impact vital medicines access in low- and middle-income countries.

An image of the COVID vaccine.

To Increase Vaccine Manufacturing in LMICs, We Also Need to Strengthen Regulatory Capacity

A lot of recent discussions focus on how to expand COVID-19 vaccine manufacturing capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The conversations highlight the importance of technology transfer and the capability of the tech transfer receiving sites (the facilities in these countries that would then produce vaccines locally), including having specialized equipment and personnel.

A gloved hand holds a COVID-19 vaccine vial in front of a blue background

Dear President Biden and Congress: Time for US to Lead Response to the Growing COVID-19 Global Vaccine Crisis

Today we joined colleagues from CSIS, Duke University, and the COVID Collective in an open letter to the Biden Administration and US Congress with a clear message: to hasten the end of the COVID-19 global pandemic, American leadership is required to ensure universal global access to high-quality and safe vaccines, support rapid vaccine distribution and administration, and build a sustainable global network of vaccine manufacturing capacity. Vaccines offer an exit route out of the pandemic – but only if they reach a critical mass of people in need across continents, socioeconomic strata, and marginalized populations.

An image of a group of women in India wearing masks.

India Needs to Focus on Three Urgent Actions to Mitigate its COVID-19 Humanitarian Crisis

India’s second COVID-19 wave has been explosive, reaching world record totals of over 300,000 daily officially reported cases. The true number is likely to be much higher, with a large number of cases missed as indicated by the delays in testing and rapidly rising positivity rates - currently one in every four people tested are positive for COVID-19 across India. Leading models estimate that there could be over 1 million cases per day. The health service has collapsed, with queues of ambulances parked outside full hospitals, oxygen and drug shortages in multiple states, and life-saving non-COVID services interrupted.

An image of the Covid-19 vaccine

How Can We Encourage COVID-19 Vaccine Developers to Expand Manufacturing Capacity?

Safe and efficacious vaccines are our best tools for defeating COVID-19. An unprecedented research and development effort has led to 12 vaccines with full or limited use emergency authorizations globally, but vaccinating everyone in the world as quickly as possible will require additional production capacity. Currently, there is not enough manufacturing capacity globally to accelerated immunization around the world in the next six months.

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