Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

An image of the Sydney, Australia skyline.

Australia Needs More Pacific Mid-Skill Migration: Here’s How to Facilitate it

Turn on the news these days and you’re likely to be confronted with articles about worker shortages. Nurses, cooks, construction workers, accountants, care home employees, all seem to be in demand throughout high-income countries. Despite this need, these countries currently do very little to attract migrants with vocational skills, hoping that local workers, automation, and offshoring will reduce the need.

The US, NATO, and EU flags

How NATO Contributors are Resettling their Afghan Allies

Customary international humanitarian law includes a responsibility to protect journalists and aid workers from harm, but it does not cover interpreters and others working for allied members. As a result, it’s down to each individual country to determine how they feel they should respond. Here we outline the responses of six of the top ten contributors to the NATO-led forces: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

A man named Rubiel Rios Andrade dries cacao on his farm in township of La Paz, Colombia

There's No Such Thing as a “Low”-Skill Worker

High-income countries depend on immigration to help foster strong societies and economies. Yet when deciding who is allowed to enter, most use a simple dichotomy based on educational attainment: “high” and “low” skilled. In this blog, based on a new policy brief by Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP) and discussions at a recent LaMP-CGD co-hosted event, we outline why this dichotomy is wrong, and how high-income countries can build mutually beneficial migration pathways at all skill levels.

Pages