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CGD Policy Blogs

 

A graphic of an interconnected globe.

The Future of Globalization

Amidst the debate, fears, political polarization, and regrets surrounding globalization, we cannot ignore a central reality: much of it is not reversible or even resistable. As in other periods of human history where new connections are forged between geographies and civilizations—whether driven by empire building, technological change, regime change, or climate change-driven migration—Pandora’s Box, once opened, cannot be closed. We explore the major forces that will shape globalization in the future, and the policy and institutional changes needed globally and across a broad swath of countries.

An image of the IMF/World Bank Meetings.

Don’t Lose Sight of the Real Business of the IMF-World Bank Annual Meetings

Anyone who follows the media on development finance will not be surprised if the corridor talk at the upcoming Annual Meetings of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) is affected by the recent World Bank decision to discontinue the Doing Business Index. These discussions will invariably include the implications for data management and integrity at the Bank as well as spillovers questions regarding the leadership at both institutions.

An image of the IMF logo.

Low-Income Countries Need a Boost for the Recovery. Here's How the IMF Can Step Up

Most observers gave the IMF high marks for its initial response to the COVID-19 crisis. It responded quickly with emergency financing to 86 countries, including a fivefold increase in its concessional lending to low-income countries. And its leadership was quick to recognize that the unprecedented nature of the crisis warranted a different approach to macroeconomic and financial policy.

An image of a patient receiving the COVID-19 vaccine from a doctor.

A New IMF Pandemic Window Could Provide $30 Billion to Finance Vaccines for Developing Countries

While those lucky enough to live in the United States or Europe fret about the extra weeks before their vaccine jab is scheduled, 6 billion people in developing countries will need to wait months, if not years. COVID-19 vaccine production lags far behind demand, and one reason why developing countries find themselves at the back of the queue is that they were unable collectively to make the firm financial offers for advance purchases when these vaccines were still in the making.

Benno Ndulu speaking at a 2018 CGD event

Remembering Benno Ndulu

The CGD family is mourning the recent loss of our friend and colleague, Benno Ndulu. Benno was a towering intellect and a forceful policymaker. He was also a friend to CGD.

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