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CGD Policy Blogs

 

For the IMF Package in the Omnibus Budget, a Sigh of Relief — and a Warning for the Future

Congress finally gave the administration what it has been asking for on IMF quota reform, and then some. At the same time, Congress didn’t just give the administration the ability to go forward on governance reform that gives more voting power to rising developing countries.  It also included some potentially consequential conditions on its approval. Here we see risks going forward that are manageable but will require some skillful navigation by the next administration.  

Congress Talks MDBs

It was a beautiful, barely-fall Friday in Washington, which made it all the more impressive that twelve members dropped in on a morning House Financial Services Subcommittee hearing on the multilateral development banks (MDBs).

Dismantling US Leadership One Budget at a Time, Part 2

My earlier post on congressional funding for multilateral institutions betrayed little optimism about the Senate’s willingness to restore devastating funding cuts imposed by the House of Representatives. I had no idea.

The newly released Senate funding levels are just barely an improvement over the House’s draconian cuts, slashing the president’s multilateral budget in half. When cuts of 50 percent mark an improvement, you know you’re in trouble.

Doing the Math on AIIB Governance

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank’s new articles of agreement contain a great deal of information about shareholding and governance in the new institution. However, the articles require some additional analysis in order to answer key questions about voting power and board composition. Based on the information provided, we are able to generate voting shares as well as some preliminary conclusions about the composition of the AIIB’s board of directors.

I Just Read the AIIB’s Articles of Agreement, and Here’s What I Think

The Chinese government has published the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank’s (AIIB) newly adopted articles of agreement. That’s an encouraging early sign of transparency, and more importantly, of timely transparency. Much of what’s in the articles was foreshadowed by previous comments and reporting, but there are surprises, such as stronger-than-expected veto powers for the Chinese and the possibility for non-sovereign membership.

ADB’s Merger Means ‘Big Gains for Development’

Good news from the Asian Development Bank's annual meetings in Baku, Azerbaijan this past weekend, where shareholders approved a plan to almost double the amount of financing available to developing countries. Bank president Takehiko Nakao's proposal to merge the ADB's concessional and non-concessional lending was nearly two years in the making.

Will the World Bank Still Be Center Stage When It Turns 75?

What does it mean when a majority of the World Bank’s shareholders (measured by voting shares) decides to put capital in a new multilateral development bank (MDB) and not the World Bank itself? The flood of countries joining the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is unavoidably a soul-searching moment for the Washington-based institution long known simply as “the bank” in the development community.