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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Development in 2016 – CGD Podcast

In 2016 on the CGD Podcast, we have discussed some of development's biggest questions: How do we pay for development? How do we measure the sustainable development goals (SDGs)? What should we do about refugees and migrants? And is there life yet in the notion of globalism? The links to all the full podcasts featured and the work they reference are below, but in this edition, we bring you highlights of some of those conversations.

Bridging the Gap Between Health and Finance: How Can Finance Ministries Support a Sustainable HIV Response?

At our recent event, “How Can Finance Ministries Support a Sustainable HIV Response?” representatives from PEPFAR and the US Department of Treasury came together to discuss an innovative partnership between them and with finance ministries around the world. The partnership aims to improve the coordination and productivity of resources devoted to combatting HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries, and to strengthen the long-term feasibility of these efforts.

GAO Report Misses the Point on USG Ebola Response

Having tried and mostly failed to track what was going on with US Government performance and spending on Ebola, I welcome the GAO’s overview of obligations and disbursements by appropriation account and strategy pillar. Now the scope of this report appears to be narrow, so let’s hope there’s more to come. A performance audit should go beyond the money to look at what actually happened; what organizations, activities and products were funded; what were the results on the outcomes that matter—Ebola transmission, rapid control of Ebola outbreaks; whether second-order economic impacts were mitigated; and how outbreak preparedness has evolved over time.

3 Memos to the Next US President – Podcast with Nancy Birdsall

CGD founding president Nancy Birdsall has seen a few US presidents come and go in her long career as a leading development economist, but her message to all occupants of the White House has remained fairly steady: Enact smart policies that help developing countries build stable, prosperous economies of their own—and that will help people at home too. This week she joins the CGD Podcast to talk about some of those ideas, and why development should be a priority for the next US president.

FP2020: Three Things to Ask About Next Week’s Progress Report

The Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) initiative hit its midpoint this year, about four years after its launch by global health leaders in 2012. Set up to “expand access to family planning information, services, and supplies to an additional 120 million women and girls in 69 of the world’s poorest countries by 2020,” the initiative has faced the usual cat herding challenges that go along with its expansive mandate to recruit new funding commitments, track actual spending, coordinate donors and country actions, report on trends in contraceptive prevalence and other FP2020 goals, serve as a clearinghouse for data and knowledge, work with countries to do better planning, and serve as a global voice and advocate.

Getting Serious on Global Health Security

Zika’s rapid spread has focused media attention on how poorly prepared both rich and less rich countries are for infectious disease outbreaks. And while it seems that we are still flailing, in fact, the international community has been trying to do better for a while. Perhaps the most significant response came in 2014 when the G7 (including the US Government) endorsed the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), a partnership of governments and international organizations aiming to accelerate achievement of the core outbreak preparedness and response capacities required by the International Health Regulations.

Water Water Everywhere? A World Water Week Q&A with Louis Boorstin

In his previous role as head of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Louis Boorstin worked to co-invest with the World Bank in at-scale programs that would be rigorously evaluated. The unique result: lives saved in the real world, measured rigorously, with lessons about what did and didn’t work so well. As experts, practitioners, and advocates gather in Stockholm to celebrate World Water Week, here’s a Q&A with Louis—in his own words—on what he’s learned from his experience:

Six Ways the Next US President Can Do Better on Global Health

The next US president will face ongoing and emerging global health crises. The next administration must work to transform the US approach to global health and global health security to protect the health of Americans here at home and ensure the long-term sustainability of US-supported health gains abroad. So, what changes should the next US president and administration implement? Here are our six concrete recommendations. 

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