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An image of an African doctor wearing protective mask and gloves using tablet working in clinic.

The New C19economics.org: A Platform to Support the Generation and Use of Health Economics Research to Tackle COVID-19

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, the scientific community has worked around the clock to produce evidence to support decision-makers in all aspects of pandemic management. As of April 2021, there are more than 78,000 articles published in peer reviewed journals and pre-prints (as indexed by collabovid.org). Those unprecedented collective research efforts have supported decisionmakers across the world on some of the toughest choices in decades, from closing economies, to procuring vaccines and medical supplies and equipment, and preparing for the uncertain year ahead.

Slide laying out features of teacher PFP programs, from who and what gets rewarded to the structure of rewards.

Teacher Pay for Performance: Does It Really Work?

We were asked: were teacher pay for performance schemes, where teachers are rewarded for better performance, the way to go? So, we embarked on a comprehensive review of the literature on teacher PFP in low and middle-income countries to help answer the big question—does it really work? Our team’s conditional “perhaps, but possibly not” answer was not very inspiring.

 Figure. Potential pathways from foundational literacy and numeracy to life outcomes

Foundational Literacy and Numeracy Skills Are Important, Obviously. But Are They More Important than All Other Education Investments?

It’s rare to read an education report these days that doesn’t mention the learning crisis. That’s not surprising. Literacy and numeracy skills among children are dismally low: less than half of all children in low- and middle-income countries can read by the time they are 10 years old. As these data have emerged in recent years, the global education community has swung its focus sharply toward learning.

Graph showing that vaccination rates will rise much more quickly in wealthy countries, with the gap peaking in early 2022, then eventually closing in 2023

How Biden Can End “Vaccine Apartheid”

Building on spectacular scientific achievements, the rich world’s vaccine response to the pandemic within its borders has been (with notable exceptions) commendable. But the response of the international community has been mystifyingly myopic and unconscionably delinquent. We’re headed toward global “vaccine apartheid.” Visibly leading the charge to vaccinate the world, with significant political and financial commitments, offers the US the chance to regain considerable soft power.

An image of the IMF logo.

Low-Income Countries Need a Boost for the Recovery. Here's How the IMF Can Step Up

Most observers gave the IMF high marks for its initial response to the COVID-19 crisis. It responded quickly with emergency financing to 86 countries, including a fivefold increase in its concessional lending to low-income countries. And its leadership was quick to recognize that the unprecedented nature of the crisis warranted a different approach to macroeconomic and financial policy.

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