Ideas to Action:

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CGD Policy Blogs

 

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MDBs Could Do More to Build Markets Just By Releasing More Data

You may have missed a recent dry-sounding but groundbreaking report, Default Statistics: Private and Sub-Sovereign Lending 2001-2019. It summarizes data from the Global Emerging Markets (GEMs) Risk Database for a set of 11 multilateral development banks (MDBs) and development finance institutions (DFIs) on default rates on their credits to private and sub-sovereign borrowers, which accounted for 82 percent of exposure in 2019.

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MDBs As First Responders? The COVID-19 Record So Far

How have the MDBs responded to the COVID-19 crisis? A CGD note just published assembles data published so far for four of the major MDBs on their financial commitments to governments and the private sector in 2020 compared to 2008-2009 during the Global Financial Crisis. Here we summarize the sobering results.

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Forging an MDB System: The Missing Piece in the Governance Architecture

Few would argue that collaboration and collective efforts across the multilateral development banks (MDBs) are not urgently needed. Yet while the logic and need are obvious, the actual extent of collaboration between MDBs is limited. Our recent paper explores how this gap in the international financial architecture might usefully be filled. It addresses what a new cross-MDB governing body might do and what it might look like.

Joe Biden speaking at the 2019 Iowa Federation of Labor Convention in Altoona, Iowa. Photo by Gage Skidmore / via Wikimedia Commons

$1.9 Trillion and No Money for the Multilateral Development Banks?

The Biden administration and the Congress rightly went big in the recently passed American Rescue Plan at a time of tremendous need. The package was appropriately focused on the domestic side, but it did not neglect the rest of the world. One might reasonably ask then why $1 billion or $2 billion could not have been included for fighting the poverty, food insecurity, and health crises driven by the pandemic. That would have amounted 0.05 to 0.1 percent of the total package. And it would have been multiplied many times over in additional poverty reduction dollars, because that it was the MDB model does.