Ideas to Action:

Independent research for global prosperity

CGD Policy Blogs

 

BBC on the Global Fund: Behind the Scenes

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria will host its fourth replenishment meeting this week in Washington, DC where it’s hoping to raise $15 billion to support its work for the next three years.  On the eve of the replenishment, the BBC will air a 30-minute segment on its show Panorama titled “Where’s Our Aid Money Gone” that – judging by the synopsis – will likely take a more critical view of the Global Fund than much of its recent press (see herehere, and here).

Cash Transfers and Deeper Causes of Poverty

The Economist’s take on the Give Directly evaluation argues that unconditional cash transfers (UCT) “don’t deal with the deeper causes of poverty.”  The article cites Baird and co-authors’ review showing that vigorously enforced conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs generate larger effects on school enrollment than UCT, and suggests that CCT are thus better positioned to address the root causes of poverty.

PEPFAR’s Impending Leadership Transition

It appears that the worst kept secret in Washington is out: Ambassador Goosby is expected to step down as Global AIDS Coordinator later this year. As CGD has done for similar leadership transitions, we are working on a report to examine the future direction of PEPFAR and consider which tasks PEPFAR’s next leader should put near the top of the program’s list of priorities. One preliminary conclusion: Goosby’s successor will certainly face programmatic challenges, but the political ones may prove to be more difficult.

The Results Are In! Incentives for Improving Health in Argentina

Argentina is a highly decentralized federal country, where more than 70% of public spending on health happens sub-nationally by independent provincial governments. Since budgetary transfers between levels of government have no conditions attached, the federal government has often struggled to influence the efficiency and impact of provincial government spending.

New Data, Same Story: Disease Still Concentrated in Middle-Income Countries

This is a joint post with Yuna Sakuma.

The majority of the world’s sick live in middle-income countries (MIC) – mainly Pakistan, India, Nigeria, China and Indonesia (or PINCI), according to new data from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington.  Sound familiar? Andy Sumner, Denizhan Duran, and I came to the same conclusion in a 2011 paper, but we used 2004 disease burden data, which didn’t provide an up-to-date view of reality.  So I was pleased to see that our findings still hold based on IHME’s 2010 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) estimates.  

Multilateralism-lite Might Miss the Big Picture

This is a joint post with Jenny Ottenhoff.

My colleague Scott Morris pointed out in a recent blog that the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria will likely surpass the World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) as the single largest foreign assistance contribution the United States makes to a multilateral institution.  He described this move as “multilateralism-lite” – or a reliance on earmarking through multilateral channels by sector or country – and suggests this isn’t an optimal approach to poverty reduction and development.

You Say You Want a (Data) Revolution?

This is a joint post with Alex Ezeh.

The long-awaited high-level panel report on the post-2015 development agenda called for a “data revolution” and proposes a new international initiative to get the job done.  The proposed public-private initiative, called the Global Partnership on Development Data, would be responsible for developing a strategy to address gaps in critical information, improving data availability, and ensuring that quality baseline information is in place to measure and define progress against established development goals.

Pages