Ideas to Action:

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CGD Policy Blogs

 

Oops: Economists in Confused Search for the Middle Class in the Developing World

This is a joint post with Christian Meyer.

With rapid growth in emerging market economies in the last decade, millions of people have entered the new global middle class. That has created new consumer markets in Latin America, Africa, and Asia – a good example: Dunkin’ Donuts going to India – and sparked considerable interest in the global financial and corporate communities.

Was the Charles Taylor Trial Worth the Price Tag?

This is a joint-post with Alaina Varvaloucas. Varvaloucas is a student at Yale Law School and formerly worked for Oxford University’s Centre for the Study of African Economies, based in Freetown.

Yesterday, after 9 years and nearly $250 million dollars spent, the Special Court for Sierra Leone in the Hague sentenced former Liberian President Charles Taylor to 50 years in prison after convicting him on 11 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Taylor's trial has been an important milestone in the struggle to end impunity for tyrants and mass murderers. But the international community's guilt-ridden obsession with pursuing the Charles Taylors of the world is skewing the allocation of resources in war-torn countries toward celebrity trials and away from poor people with limited access to justice.

Rethinking Monetary, Regulatory, and Financial Policies in the Midst of the Global Crisis – Liliana Rojas-Suarez

On May 22nd, members of the Latin American Shadow Financial Regulatory Committee (CLAAF) convened at CGD to discuss some of the most pressing fiscal and monetary issues affecting Latin American economies. The result of the committee’s two-and-a-half-day-long discussion was a four page statement and several clear recommendations for rethinking financial policies in the midst of a global crisis.

Finance Lessons from Emerging Markets for Europe and the United States

Last week I was one of a handful of speakers at the annual meeting of the Bretton Woods Committee, a non-partisan group that works to promote international economic cooperation and to foster strong, effective Bretton Woods institutions (i.e. the IMF and World Bank). Other speakers at the meeting, which was titled “From Vicious to Virtuous: The Cycle of Debt, Stability, and Growth” included U.S. Rep.

Which Studies Should Someone Be Paid to Reexamine?

Probably you agree that actions meant to help poor people should be guided by the best science about what works. (Or perhaps you also have a problem with motherhood and apple pie.) And probably you'd concede that part of what makes science science is replicability. Cold fusion is a scientific joke, not a scientific advance, because the experiments seeming to generate evidence of fusion at room temperature could not be independently reproduced.

The Climate Change Vulnerability Index -- David Wheeler

This Wonkcast was originally recorded in April 2011.

Rapid climate change is upon us, and governments, multilateral organizations, and development agencies are preparing to dole out billions of dollars in adaptation assistance. Nevertheless, little research has gone into calculating which countries are most vulnerable to global warming.

On this Wonkcast, I’m joined by David Wheeler, senior fellow at the Center for Global Development, who created an index for determining which countries should be prioritized when the money starts to flow. His paper, “Quantifying Vulnerability to Climate Change: Implications for Adaptation Assistance”, provides an index for comparison of cross-country vulnerability to some of the most extreme climate threats. An accompanying map makes it easy to see which countries will be hit hardest.

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