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Public Event

Every Dollar Counts: How Global AIDS Donors Can Better Link Funding Decisions to Performance

Monday, May 10, 2010 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

Billions of dollars have been allocated to fight HIV/AIDS in poor countries over the past decade, yet less than half of those requiring treatment receive it, and for every two people put on treatment, five more become newly infected. Economic pressures and competing global health priorities are forcing donors to do more with their available funds. One way to improve the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS programs is to tie funding decisions to performance. Doing this systematically rewards strong performance and incentivizes recipients to improve on poor performance. 

On Monday, May 10, 2010 The HIV/AIDS Monitor team launched a new report: Are Funding Decisions Based on Performance? that examines how three of the largest AIDS donors--the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Global Fund to Fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria, and the World Bank's Multi-Country HIV/AIDS Program for Africa (the MAP)--have applied the principles of performance based funding in Mozambique, Uganda, and Zambia. Nandini Oomman, Director of the HIV/AIDS Monitor at CGD, presented key findings and recommendations from the report, which was followed by a moderated discussion with donor officials and PBF experts to discuss the ways in which AIDS donors could strengthen the use of measures of past program performance in decisions about future funding.

Panelists included Paul Bouey, Deputy Coordinator, Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator; Daniel Low-Beer, Unit Director, Performance, Impact and Effectiveness, The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria; Beth Ann Plowman, Independent Evaluation Expert; and Miriam Schneidman, Lead Health Specialist, Africa Region, The World Bank. Lawrence MacDonald, Vice President of Communications and Policy Outreach, Center for Global Development, moderated the discussion.

Access Oomman's slides (pdf, 439K).

Miriam Schneidman (left) and Daniel Low-Beer (right). Beth Ann Plowman (left) and Paul Bouey (right).
Event Audience Attendees talk with panelists.
Lawrence MacDonald Nandini Oomman

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